S C O T T E R I C P E T E R S E N

Composer, electronic musician, improviser

Fun with Feedback (and SuperCollider)

You are not the only one, she loves it too!

A couple of weeks ago I posted some audio and code examples of a software matrix mixer I made with SuperCollider.  I thought a post going into some detail about feedback and how to code it may be of help to those new to the concept as a creative tool, or to using it within SuperCollider.  Lets first start with some basics of a feedback circuit.

The necessary components of a feedback system (the bare bones) are an input source (some sound, if only line-level hum) and an independent loop with a gain control.  Check out the diagram below.

diagram showing basic feedback circuit

The feedback loop can be accomplished in a number of ways.  If you have ever used a mic in an auditorium (or been to school for that matter) you have already probably experienced feedback in the form of a high-pitched squeal.  The microphone picks up your voice, is routed to a mixer, is amplified (gain) and played out the room speakers.  The sound coming out the speakers is then picked up by the mic in addition to your voice.  The squeal occurs when the amplitude of the input signal (your voice plus the amplified version coming back over the speakers) is loud enough that with each cycle the overall gain increases.  Cut the amplification out to the speakers and the squeal stops.  The quality of the feedback (the frequencies amplified) have to do with the microphone’s resonant frequencies in combination with a lot of other factors (room size and resonance, quality of the audio gear being used, whether the signal is balanced or unbalanced, matching or mismatched impedance, etc.)

In the mixer feedback post I did a couple weeks back, the input signal was the inherent noise of the analog mixer with gain applied at each stage of the 4-stage feedback loop.  In any analog system there is always noise present because of the nature of electrical circuits and the power required to make them work.  The same is not true for purely digital (software) feedback systems so some generated sound input signal is necessary.

Below is some very simple SuperCollider codez to demonstrate this simplest of feedback loops and a recording so you don’t have to run the code.  If you do run the code in SC, be careful when moving the mouse to the right of the screen.  As you approach 1, the feedback loop will become increasingly loud until at 1 and beyond, it becomes exponentially loud until things break.  (And by ‘things’ I mean your speakers and/or eardrums and/or the SC server :P)  In the recording below, i just move the mouse to the right to “max out” the feedback loop, then drop back after it maxes out.

Here is another version with a simple half-second delay built into the processing section.  Note that this rids us of the ear-piercing noise that occurred in the above example.  In the recording I’m moving the mouse to the right, then back and forth across the screen to make a more interesting texture.  I then just let it build up with the mouse all the way to the right.

The next two examples are of slightly more interesting feedback circuits.  In the first version I have fixed the gain at 1.1 so it the sound eventually reaches saturation and does not return.  I’ve removed the limiter and replaced it ‘.clip’ which squares off the wave form resulting in audible distortion of the signal.  I have also added a random line generator ‘speed’ to control some aspects of the sound, the resonant frequency of a low pass filter and the delay time.

Here is a version that uses the built-in mic and adds some cheesy panning.

While these samples are a few steps away from being art, they show the power of possibility lurking in feedback circuits.  The truth of synthesis is that, with a few exceptions, the more intricate (complex) a sound is, the more realistic and better it sounds.  Adding a feedback loop to a sound introduces a few more layers of complexity and can have beautiful as well as destructive results.

If you are interested in hearing some truly excellent feedback music, check out the work of David Tudor.  The complexity of his circuits is both astounding and elegant, and the sonic results are really fantastic.

Viva la feedback!

Filed under: Code, Music, Phase 1, SC3 - Code - Music - More, , , , , , ,

Scott gets a Marxophone

Marxist-phone-what?  Heather’s parents got me a gen-u-ayn Marxophone (a fretless zither!) for my birthday.  (Thanks Jim and Karen!)  Imagine my surprise when they showed up with several boxes of fantastic electronic toys to dissect, the culmination of which was this fantastic instrument.  (I might add, I had never heard of nor seen one of these in my life!)  While it doesn’t plug in, this instrument has a lot to like.  I don’t know if it is the “invention of the century” as it was touted to be in the early 1900s, but it makes some really neat noises!

Now before you Tea Party faithful start commenting on the destruction of the American way of life at the hands of Marxophonists like myself, I assure you this instrument has nothing to do with THAT Marx, nor is the instrument itself a socialist (see picture of american bald eagle with flag below.)  We will leave the owner out of this discussion for now…

From the “Marxophone Homepage:”

The Marxophone was produced by the Marxochime Colony of New Troy, Michigan which was in business from about 1927 to 1972. Henry Charles Marx (1875-1947), the founder of the company, oversaw the production of the Marxophone. Marxophones were also produced earlier by the International Musical Corporation of Hoboken, New Jersey under 1912 Patent #1044553.

My instrument lived for a very long time in a box in someones attic, so it was extraordinarily dusty and out-of-tune when I got it: just the way I like it!  There’s nothing better than the “sands of time” method of tuning for curing what ails you (*$&%# equal temperament!)  You can see the instrument demonstrated on youtube (like everything else) so I won’t launch into a lengthy description of how the instrument is constructed and played.  However, I will post some picture details of the instrument itself along with some audio.

Below is the setup I used to record the marxophone.  The only thing missing is the Shure SM58 microphone that was resting over the instrument on the mixer.  This has become my favorite setup**: cheesy Dell D620 with PureDyne Linux using qjack and Ardour to record, and Audacity to edit; Behringer 1204FX mixer with USB AD/DA converter; Shure (mentioned above); and of course my trusty and stylish Panasonic headphones.  You can see the “Marxophone” plate which is supposed to be used to hold music cards.  Beneath this is a row of metal hammers on flexible metal arms.  When depressed and held, the flexibility causes the hammer to repeated strike the string in a sort of mandolinesque fashion.

Below is the chord tuning indication sticker below the leftmost 16 strings.  This sticker indicates the tuning of the four-string chords, C-G and F major triads and a D7 to round it out.  Note that the lowest note of the “G” chord is incorrectly notated as an A on the sticker even though it says “G” directly beneath it.  Awesome!  Also awesome is the chord spacing, the D7 especially.  Someone would have failed freshman theory…

And finally, here is a closeup of the American eagle emblem above the sound hole.  America loves Marx!

Finally, here is what you have been waiting for, some sound!  This recording is the instrument as I received it, tuned by countless years in an attic, and played in as normal a fashion as was able.

With the mic resting only centimeters above the instrument and directly behind the hammer apparatus, I was able to capture the fantastic mechanistic sound of the levers in action.  If you are like me, this sound is much more interesting than the typical hammer-on-string sound.

And finally, the instrument as it was intended to sound by Marx himself… or at least close.  It took 11 minutes to get to the point that this recording comes in: 1 chord “tuned” and 4 notes of a hexachord almost up to snuff.  I continue to attempt to tune the instrument, but by the time I get the G and A in tune, the C, D and E are fantastically flat.  I probably should have put a warning on this post for persons with perfect pitch…

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** I have several Macbook Pros laying around with a MOTU traveler among other interfaces at my disposal.  The idea, though, of making great recordings/music with hardware that totals around $350 bucks and contains no proprietary software really tickles my… fancy.  Perhaps this all smacks of communist propaganda (again!) but working on-the-cheap gives me a warm feeling inside: it’s nice to know I don’t have to drop $4,000 on gear and software to make art.  I plan to post about this in the future.

Filed under: Current Projects, Miscellany, Phase 1

Mixer Feedback Music: 1204FX Improvisation 2

WARNING:

(every good post should begin with one!)

Following any of the steps below to create feedback loops with mixers can harm your gear and more detrimentally, your ears.  The results are often unpredictable and almost always extremely loud.  The pulse waves created by these kinds of setups and heard in the recording below are very hard on the ear mechanism (as you will be able to tell by listening.)  Please take all precautions to limit the amplitude of your speakers and, if listening on headphones, to start with the volume very low and turn it up as needed.  If you plan to attempt the following setup or one like it, start with all volumes at the minimum and raise them once you know what your results are going to be.

Note: the piece begins very quietly, the first loud sound is around 1:26.

1204-10-29

The following is a list of equipment used in the above improvisation.

  • Dell Latitude D620 (1.6gHz, 1GB RAM) running the latest PureDyne distribution
  • Jack and Ardour to record the improvisation
  • Behringer XENYX1204FX mixer for all sound generation
  • 4 1/4 TS cables
  • 4 RCA cables
  • Headphones

Kane recently played a few recordings for me of experiments he had done with feedback systems created using his 1204 mixer.  The sounds were appealing and I thought it would be fun to see what it was like to make music with only a mixer for an instrument.  My 1204FX has on-board DSP that Kane’s model does not.  Normally, I do not use the processor at all, but for this exercise it was useful in adding variation to the signal flow and achieving a variety of sonic results.

Last night I experimented for about 2 hours with different routing schemes and to get used to controlling the mixer as a sound-generator.  I recorded 8-10 tests and ended up with about 45 minutes of pretty good material which I may use at some point in the future.  I then recorded 1204-10-29 in one take, using only the 2-channel output from the mixer.  There is no additional material in the recording, nor any post-processing aside from normalization.  The following is the routing recipe I used.

Routing the 1204FX

The first pair of feedback loops was connected as follows:

Alt 3 output –> channel 1 input (trim at +60) –> sent to Alt 3-4
Alt 4 output –> channel 2 input (trim at +60) –> sent to Alt 3-4

The second pair of loops was connected like so:

Aux Send 2 –> channel 5/6 L (+4) –> Main Mix (no Alt 3-4) –> Aux Sends 1-2 alternately as desired
Aux Send 1 –> channel 7/8 R (+4) –> Main Mix (no Alt 3-4) –> Aux Sends 1-2 alternately as desired

Aux Sends 1-2 at +15
Aux Returns at +5 to +10
Aux Return 1 to Aux Send 1 at +5

The reverberation heard is the built-in “Chapel” reverberation, program 19 on the mixer.  I used the Control Room R & L output channels to route the audio to my laptop for recording.  I monitored the sound using the headphone jack on the mixer with the volume as near to zero as I could get it.  (At some points this was not enough and I had to quickly pull the phones off.)

Useful parameters for making music

There are many ways to achieve sonic variation within the mixer.  The controls I used were the “pre” buttons for each channel, which control signal flow to the main mix and the aux sends, the faders for each channel plus the ALT 3-4 and Main Mix stereo faders, the “ALT 3-4” buttons, the AUX 1-2 faders, the pan controls, and the 3-band EQ for each channel.  (Is that everything, you say?  Almost, I didn’t touch the trims, the low cuts, or the aux send knobs below the DSP area.)  The controls I used the most were the volume faders and the 3-band EQs.  All of the frequency variation (thumping lows to screaming frequencies around 12k) was accomplished by turning down two of the three EQ bands, and playing with the remaining band while simultaneously working the volume fader for that channel.

If you are interested in experimenting with a mixer like this, trial and error will be your best guide.  Try making the channel settings similar for all channels and then changing them one by one to clearly hear the results.  Or try using only 1 or 2 of the channels and later adding the rest one by one.  Most of all, play with the levels a lot: I noticed that in several instances minute changes to a single channel produced startling results.  Also get to know your routing: changing the ALT 3-4 stereo faders will affect all of the channels using the ALT 3-4 pair, while playing with the gain of an individual channel will only affect other channels that share its signal path.  By bypassing the aux sends (the DSP) you can have two layers of sound, one processed and the other dry (you can hear this clearly in my piece), so experiment with foreground and background layers.

Here, again, for your edification is my improvisation… I know you don’t want to scroll all the way back to the top of the page.

1204-10-29

Filed under: Current Projects, Music, Phase 1, , , , , , , , , , ,

Lost Voices of Blasphemous Friends

In 2006 I both completed recording for, and abandoned, a sound installation for 8 speakers.  The work, originally titled Voices of Blasphemous Friends was intended for installation at a festival to which I was never invited.  I recently stumbled upon the recordings, mostly in a state of discombobulation, and the 5 movements/excerpts I used to submit to the festival.  Perhaps it is the magic of the passing of time, perhaps it was hearing the voices of far away friends, but I was immediately drawn to these recordings.  I here present them unedited and in the state in which I left them 4 years ago.  I will now refer to the work collectively as the Lost Voices of Blasphemous Friends (for obvious reasons.)

To create the piece, I tricked eight friends into writing two questions to me via email under the assumption that at some point that year I would invite them up to Rochester (where I was living at the time) to record them asking me the questions.  I then collected the questions they sent me and put them all together, compiling a list of 18 questions (including two of my own) and a few monologues I asked select people to write.  When the “interviewer” showed up to quiz me, I informed them that in reality they would be the ones answering the questions, and that there were not two, but 18 questions, and that additionally they would be required to sing, hum, and perform other assorted tasks as required by the questions.  After I recorded them answering there own, and other’s questions, I had each one ask me the questions as well.  I did not prepare any answers.

The questions themselves ranged from “Did you have anything to do with the bombing?” to the classy question “who do you think says the word ‘fuck’ the best?”  There is also a question of epic proportion that takes nearly a minute to ask and can be heard below in the piece Question #9.  Originally, the work was to take the form of “a whole and then parts.”  By this I mean that the questions and answers were to be presented unedited, one set per speaker, followed by “movements;” edited portions of the set of whole recordings which would take the form of canons, dance music, and more, using only material from the recordings with no alterations of pitch and duration, nor processing that would mask the original sound.

For much more detail into the philosophical underpinnings of the work I will have to dig (provided something good doesn’t come on the TV.)  Until then, please have a listen to the short pieces/excerpts below.  I hope you will enjoy them.

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Lost Voices of Blasphemous Friends

excerpt of 1+ hour of questions sounding simultaneously, spatialized here to imitate 8 speakers in a rectangular arrangement

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Baboons

monologue written and read by Marc Bollmann

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Question #9

question written by Solomon Guhl-Miller, asked by Scott Petersen (8 different times)

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Giselle

monologue written and read by Matt Barber

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Breakdown : or I am the Destructicon

voices, beat-boxing, and knee-slapping by Ethan Borshansky, Gabriela Ponce, Scott Petersen, other

Filed under: Music, Phase 1, , , , , , ,

Analog Ring Modulation Circuit

Above is a video and below are some pictures of a simple ring mod circuit I whipped up last night. The circuit is the classic circuit, and I’m simply running two oscillators from a hex schmidt 6-oscillator IC through the circuit as the carrier and modulator. The frequencies of the hex schmidt are being controlled by a PSR (photosensitive resistor) and an FSR (force sensing resistor) respectively. The video shows fairly well how the PSR reacts to the light. The function of the FSR is a little less clear visually, but you can hear it pretty plainly. I can throw up (!) a schematic of the circuit if anyone is interested, but you should be able to find one by doing a google search.

The project requires a 5V power source (batteries only!) a bread board or project board, some wire (i prefer solid-core) two diodes, two capacitors (0.1uf), 1 133k (or thereabouts) resistor, one PSR, one FSR, one hex schmitt oscillator (mm74c14n) and an audio cable or female 1/8 audio jack to run into a) an amplifier, b) a mixer, or c) your computer.  In this case I have two alligator clips attached to the cut-off and split end of a 1/8 audio cable, the other end of which is running into a mixer and then out to small speakers.

Next on the agenda I think I’m going to build me an ADSR for it. This site has a really great page on ADSRs with diagrams, circuit board patterns, etc.

Filed under: Current Projects, Miscellany, Phase 1, , , , , , , , , ,

(tiny) Nifty Codez

I realize from looking through this site that I need to start posting more code (and resulting recordings.) Part of my motivation is that SC3 (now 3.4!) never ceases to amaze me with its possibilities. One can, with a very small amount of code, achieve some incredibly intricate, beautiful sounds. The below is one example.


{var func, ampFunc; func=LFNoise1.kr(LFNoise1.kr(1!2,0.005,0.02)!3,1000!3,1500!3);
ampFunc=LFNoise1.kr(LFNoise1.kr(1!2,0.4,0.5)!3,0.4!3,0.5!3);
FreeVerb.ar(SinOsc.ar(func,func%pi,ampFunc%1), 0.75,0.75);}.play;

The code all fits in one function ( {} ) and involves 6 UGens and a couple of variables. Basically, the LFNoise1 UGens are random line generators. I’ve nested them inside each other to add even more variability in how the randomness occurs, how often and how much the line moves within the given range. This are then duplicated several times for each parameter (using the ! operator) and applied to the sine-tone oscillator’s frequency, phase, and amplitude parameters. All is wrapped in a warm reverberant blanket of FreeVerb for that roomy effect. Note that the way I’m using the ! operator is sort of a hack and creates many redundant versions of the same integers. This can result in channel number mismatches and amplitudes of over 1. To solve this, the code can be simply modified with a Mix UGen that mixes the array of channels down to (in this case) 2 channels, and adding a multiplier of 0.5 ( ) * 0.5}… ) to keep the amplitudes below 1.


{var func, ampFunc; func=LFNoise1.kr(LFNoise1.kr(1!2,0.005,0.02)!3,1000!3,1500!3);
ampFunc=LFNoise1.kr(LFNoise1.kr(1!2,0.4,0.5)!3,0.4!3,0.5!3);
Mix(FreeVerb.ar(SinOsc.ar(func,func%pi,ampFunc%1), 0.75,0.75);)*0.5}.drawAndPlay;

Note the above uses an added method called drawAndPlay which graphs out the above code in GraphViz so one can visually see exactly what’s going on. The below png file (click it) shows what happens behind the scenes.

Here is a recording of the above code. Note: each time the code is run, the results are different, sometimes subtly, sometimes more noticeably.

The beauty of SC3 is that it is extremely customizable/flexible in terms of coding styles. The above code could be condensed even further, and made to fit in a tweet, for example, but for visual and pedagogical purposes I made it more visually self-explanitory.

I will hopefully post more small examples as the summer weeks pass by. Stay tuned, and stay cool.

\sP

Filed under: Code, Phase 1, SC3 - Code - Music - More, , , , , , ,

EeePC + Ubuntu 10.04 + Arduino (Mini-Tutorial-of-Sorts)

1. I’m not good at tutorial writing. This is not because I do not have the willingness or ability to write tutorials, but because I lack the patience to write tutorials. However, because I seem to have 3x the number of difficulties that everyone else does doing anything, I have started taking copious notes whilst undertaking any dubious technological task and therefore find myself in the position of being able to at least expound in some detail the products of my activities.

2. There are better and more informative tutorials on the web than I could ever hope to write with one caveat: all tutorials approach the same subject in different ways with different levels of detail. All have a slant. The particular slant of the tutorial you find on the web may or may not suit your aims and may or may not solve your problems. Therefore, it is better to have too many than too little tuts, even if they overlap in many details.

3. A warning: all information on this post is from personal experience only, and in no way guarantees success for you, or even that following the steps listed below will not erase your hard drive and explode your Arduino. Having said that, there’s a good chance (37%) that Linux Gnomes* will erase your HD and explode your Arduino at any time anyway, so you might as well proceed!

4. Some links. (Here? Honestly? I mean, it’s like I don’t even want you to keep reading…)

ARDUINO

While I disagree with her choice of beverage (Merlot with Arduino?!?!? Really, this is a scotch project board if ever one was invented!!!) Limor has tonnes** of awesome pages on a really fun web site that will “learn you” something fierce!

LADYADA

So Here Goes

I was recently bored. While I have a perfectly working and configured Arduino workstation/setup on multiple Macs, I figured I would get one up and running on my little EeePC as a means of expending spare time as I hurtle through space.

Download

I downloaded the linux package here and just unzipped the package to my home folder.

Run

Open a shell and navigate to the arduino-0018 folder and run the arduino script (./arduino.)

Setup

You must set your board type and serial port in the Arduino application itself under the Tools menu. If you’ve forgotten what board you have, the model is printed on the board itself, and the IC type is printed on the IC itself (ATMEGA 168, for example.)

I had two little problems:

1.) On the Linux installation page here, one is instructed to install the avr library (avr-gcc avr-g++.) I’m using Ubuntu 10.04 and the looking to install avr-g* failed, so I installed gcc-avr. (The same thing, right?) Nope. You need to install the avr-libc package or you will get the error (error: avr/io.h: No such file or directory) on compile that is mentioned on the arduino page.

2.) The second little problem that gave me a little pause was that I didn’t seem to have the File, Edit, Tools, and other menu items that I know exist and are necessary to configure Arduino to work with your board. The problem was so silly I hate to even mention it, but it was that the color of the font for these items perfectly matches my system theme, so they were effectively invisible (see pic.) Clicking in the ether, however, proved they did exist. :P

Aside from these, getting my arduino up and running was easy-peasy. Yours will be too!***

____________________________________________________________________
* Yes, they are real! linux gnomes!
** a British measurement equivalent to 2.798 metric tons and spelled “tonne”
*** This is not a true statement! Yours may not and probably will not be as easy…

Filed under: Miscellany, Phase 1, , , , ,

Stockhausen: Étude (musique concrète) 1952

I recently ran across this piece which I had not previously heard. It is the first piece of musique concrète by Stockhausen composed in 1952-53 at the RTF in Paris.

A quote about the work by Stockhausen from an online source:**

“First I recorded six sounds of variously prepared low piano strings struck with an iron beater, using a tape speed of 76.2 centimetres per second. After that, I copied each sound many times and, with scissors, cut off the attack of each sound. A few centimetres of the continuation [steady state], which was – briefly – quite steady dynamically, were used. Several of these pieces were spliced together to form a tape loop, which was then transposed to certain pitches using a transposition machine. A few minutes of each transposition were then recorded on separate tapes.

I was only allowed to have the studio with a technician for a few hours each week.Therefore, I hammered a nail into my desktop at the student hostel, laid a metal tape hub on the nail, fastened a ruler horizontally onto the desk in front of me, and placed a series of hubs with modulated tapes and one hub with leader tape next to each other at the rear of the desk. Then I cut many short pieces from a roll of white splicing tape and stuck them next to each other on the edge of the desk.

I then chose, according to my score, one of the tapes having a certain sound transposition, measured the notated length in centimetres and millimetres, cut off that length, spliced it with a little piece of the splicing tape onto a lengthy piece of white leader tape, and wound the white tape plus the first little piece of magnetic tape around the metal hub on the nail. For this I used a pencil which was inserted into the outer hole of the hub.

Next, I chose another prepared tape, measured and cut off a piece, and spliced it onto the previous piece. Whenever the score prescribed a pause, I spliced a corresponding length of white tape onto the result tape. Occasionally, my winding apparatus did not function, and tape salad was the result: I then crawled around on the floor under my desk searching for one end of the fallen tape. Once found, the confusion of the entangled tape was unravelled with great difficulty, and it was wound around the hub again.

When my studio time came, I synchronized two of my spliced tapes using two play-back tape recorders, recorded the sum on a third tape recorder and copied this result again – depending on the polyphony desired – on top of a further zebra-tape of bits of brown tape and little pieces of white pause. Already upon hearing two synchronized layers, and even more so hearing three or four layers, I became increasingly pale and helpless: I had imagined something completely different!

On the following day, the sorcery undespairingly continued: I changed my series, chose other sequences, cut other lengths, spliced different progressions, and hoped afresh for a miracle in sound.”

From another source quoting Stockhausen:**

“I can no longer recall exactly how many weeks I carried on this cutting and splicing, with ever-increasing perfection of my winding-skill. Anyway – on this CD released in 1992 – the world can now hear my Concrète ETUDE of 1952, which for many years I had presumed lost until I finally found it again in a pile of old tapes.”

While hyperbole and useless, flowery, and overtly descriptive language often accompanies any description of this piece online, I feel it is both important and necessary to describe it as awesome.  I wonder if the score is laying around in a pile somewhere… I sure would like to see it!

**all quotes from the sources above were taken from: Karlheinz Stockhausen, Compact Disk Number Three; Electronic Music 1952-1960, from the complete edition (Stockhausen Verlag), accompanying booklet.

Filed under: Miscellany, Phase 1, , , , , , ,

Audio/Video: Uncertainty Music – April 24th

Here is some low-quality video from our show at The Big Room in New Haven. More details will follow. Below is audio only.

Filed under: El MuCo, Music, Phase 1, SC3 - Code - Music - More, , , , , , , , ,

Audio/Video: Hartford Artspace, April 25th

The above is some low-quality video from our most recent show at Hartford’s Artspace. Below is audio only.

The performance space, as you will be able to tell in the recording, was cavernous. I estimate the ceiling to be between 16-20 feet. The room was exceptionally live and reverberant. Our approach is always to improvise, in the most genuine sense. We do not discuss what we are going to do before hand, nor do we really “practice.” Once we were in the space, we knew that we had to incorporate a lot of space (silence) into our improv to keep the texture from becoming too muddy. The work has a natural ramp shape as we move from sporadic and spacious to dense and thick textures at the end.

Hardware used: mostly the Casio SA-2 with a little bit of the growler. We set up the mixer so that the mic input was routed to both computers, and our computer audio was routed to each other as well. (This creates great cross-talk possibilities, and is mostly how we work now.) Kane was running his granular patch and, at the beginning, it is easy to hear him grabbing bits of what I am doing with the mic. I played the Casio a bit, banged on the mic a lot, as usual, but started with cups, forks, and my hands. The household objects were provided by Juraj Kojs who performed in a later set.

My code was primarily made up of recursive ndefs (sorry, SC3 specific stuff here…) which take the incoming sound, delay it using comb filters, feed a certain amount back into the signal, and a certain amount out to a bank of “effect” ndefs. By dynamically changing the delay length of the comb filters while running the synth, pitch-shifting occurs which varies the resulting feedback loop’s overall spectra.

Filed under: El MuCo, Music, Phase 1, SC3 - Code - Music - More, , , , , , , , , ,

G O I N G S O N : L O C A L (ISH)

fritz Art of Fritz Horstman
kane Music of Brian Kane
fritz Hartford Phase Shift
fritz Hartford Sound Alliance
Lique Art of Philip Lique
Lique Music of Matt Sargeant
strycharz Art of Heather Strycharz
uncertainty Uncertainty Music Series

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Handmade instruments by Scott Petersen and Brian Kane at Artspace New Haven